Wednesday, February 16, 2011

The Human Friends of Huckleberry Hound

Be at the mercy of Wrong-ipedia and internet Make-it-Up databases no longer. At least, when it comes to who did what on the Huckleberry Hound cartoons.

Viewers of English-language versions floating around in the not-all-that secret passages of the internet have had to settle for credit-less Huck adventures. The same in Spanish. And Portuguese. If you want to know who did what to Huck and when, you’ve had to rely on internet sites that are, at best, full of good intentions and sometimes fairly accurate. And sometimes not.

Ah, but I, Yowp, your favourite cartoon dog, have borrowed Snooper’s deerstalker hat and stalked down (okay, I found them by accident), all four seasons of Huckleberry Hound from Italian television. Yes, they have annoying cartoon bugs. But they all contain full credits, except for one cartoon which someone apparently recorded a little too late.

There are a couple of little surprises here.

Somewhere I had read that Mike Maltese worked on the Huck series and that is indeed the case. He wrote what turned out to be the second cartoon aired in the second season, Grim Pilgrim. We’ll never know why he only worked on one cartoon; it could be that Warren Foster hadn’t arrived at Hanna-Barbera yet. From what I can tell, the cartoon was the first one put into production that season. I don’t have a full production number list.

An unexpected name pops up as a layout artist on two of the cartoons—Sam Weiss. I haven’t found any of Sam’s pre-Hanna-Barbera background, but writer Earl Kress points out some people from Playhouse Pictures (at 1401 La Brea) freelanced for Hanna-Barbera (at 1410 La Brea). It could be Weiss was one of them. Like Gerard Baldwin, he found a home at Jay Ward Productions in 1959, was one of the designers of Mister Magoo’s Christmas Carol in 1962 and worked on the original Alvin series for Format Films and Roger Ramjet for Fred Crippen (who also spent time at Ward and UPA). He directed for Stephen Bosustow Productions in the ‘70s and ‘80s. His Los Angeles Times obit is here.

13 cartoons were made in the second season. Hanna-Barbera added to its animation staff that year but neither Baldwin nor George Nicholas was assigned a Huck cartoon. Another 13 cartoons followed in the third season (1960-61) and nine in the fourth and final one (1961-62). Of course, H-B expanded again in the final two seasons and you can see the names of ex-Disney people, including Noel Tucker, John Freeman and John Boersma, replacing familiar names like Carlo Vinci. Readers here are probably familiar with the backgrounds of many of the artists. Ralph Somerville had worked for Fleischer and Lantz prior to World War Two. Paul Sommer had been a director at Columbia during the war years. Don Towsley directed Bob Clampett’s solo effort for Republic, It’s a Grand Old Nag (1947) and animated on Chuck Jones’ Tom and Jerry cartoons in the ‘60s. Hicks Lokey had a long career at Lantz, Fleischer and Disney. Afraid I don’t know anything about James Carmichael. (Note: these are examples, and is not intended to be a full filmography of each and every person listed below).

Hanna-Barbera tried to expand its roster of voice talent in 1959. One of the new hires was comic actor Hal Smith. He appeared in six Huck cartoons, all in the second season. It could be that Don Messick was involved in other endeavours; Smith was used on the Quick Draw and Snooper and Blabber series where Messick didn’t play a main character. Vance Colvig, the voice of Chopper, makes an appearance as a gruff prisoner in the fourth season short Bars and Stripes. No women seem to have invaded Huck’s space; Jean Vander Pyl was restricted to incidental voices on other cartoons.

It’s probably a safe presumption that Warren Foster had his hands full in 1960 and into 1961 with The Flintstones, so Tony Benedict penned a couple of Hucks. Carl Kohler also gets one writing credit. He was a magazine cartoonist, one of the originators of CARtoons in the 1950s. His name appears on two late Warner Bros. cartoons, Chuck Jones’ Martian Through Georgia and Art Davis’ Quackodile Tears (both 1962). And, yes, the credit changes from “Story” to “Written By” in mid-third season.

All nine cartoons in the last season featured cues by Hoyt Curtin; some of them you’ll hear on Top Cat. But there was one cartoon in the previous season where Curtin’s music is hear as well. Otherwise, it’s stock music from Capitol and Langlois.

So, for your information, is a list of the credits of the final three seasons of The Huckleberry Hound Show. I’ve also listed the uncredited voice artists and which cartoons featured the Curtin cues.


SECOND SEASON
Ten Pin Alley Production No. K-027
Animation – Ed Love; Layout – Ed Benedict; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Sketches – Dan Gordon; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1959.

Grim Pilgrim Production No. K-028
Credits: Animation – Ken Muse; Layout – Dick Bickenbach; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Mike Maltese; Story Sketches – Dan Gordon; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Hal Smith.
Copyright 1959.

Jolly Roger and Out Production No. K-029
Animation – Ken Muse; Layout – Sam Weiss; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Hal Smith.
Copyright 1959.

Somebody’s Lion Production No. K-030
Animation – Dick Lundy; Layout – Sam Weiss; Backgrounds – Joe Montell; Story – Warren Foster; Story Sketches – Dan Gordon; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1959.

A Bully Dog Production No. K-031
No credits (Animation – Ken Muse; Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.)

Nottingham and Yeggs Production No. K-032
Animation – Ed Love; Layout – Walt Clinton; Backgrounds – Joe Montell; Story – Warren Foster; Story Sketches – Dan Gordon; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Hal Smith.
Copyright 1959.

Huck the Giant Killer Production No. K-033
Animation – Dick Lundy; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Bob Gentle; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1959.

Cop and Saucer Production No. K-034
Animation – Ed Love; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Joe Montell; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1959.

Pony Boy Huck Production No. K-035
Animation – La Verne Harding; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Bob Gentle; Story – Warren Foster; Story Sketches – Dan Gordon; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voice Cast: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1959.

Pet Vet Production No. K-036
Animation – Carlo Vinci; Layout – Dick Bickenbach; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Hal Smith.
Copyright 1959.

Piccadilly Dilly Production No. K-037
Animation – Don Patterson; Layout – Ed Benedict; Backgrounds – Joe Montell; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Hal Smith; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1959.

Wiki Waki Huck Production No. K-038
Animation – Lew Marshall; Layout – Walt Clinton; Backgrounds – Bob Gentle; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1959.

Huck’s Hack Production No. K-039
Animation – Don Patterson; Layout – Dick Bickenbach; Backgrounds – Fernando Montealegre; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Hal Smith.
Copyright 1959.

THIRD SEASON
Spud Dud Production No. K-040
Animation – George Nicholas; Layout – Dick Bickenbach; Backgrounds – Art Lozzi; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1960.

Legion Bound Hound Production No. K-041
Animation – Ken Muse; Layout – Dick Bickenbach; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1960.

Science Friction Production No. K-042
Animation – Ed Love; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1960.

Knight School Production No. K-043
Animation – Lew Marshall; Layout – Paul Sommer; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1960.

Nuts Over Mutts Production No. K-044
Animation – Ed Love; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1960.

Huck Hound’s Tale Production No. K-045
Animation – Ed de Mattia; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1960.

The Unmasked Avenger Production No. K-046
Animation – Don Williams; Layout – Paul Sommer; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Story – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1960.

Fast Gun Huck Production No. K-047
Animation – Brad Case; Layout – Walt Clinton; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1960.

Hillbilly Huck Production No. K-048
Animation – Hicks Lokey; Layout – Paul Sommer; Backgrounds – Vera Hanson; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1960.

Lawman Huck Production No. K-049
Animation – Bob Carr; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Bob Gentle; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1960.

Huck and Ladder Production No. K-050
Animation – Hicks Lokey; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Copyright 1960.

Astro-Nut Huck Production No. K-051
Animation – Lew Marshall; Layout – Paul Sommer; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Copyright 1960.

Cluck and Dagger Production No. K-052
Animation – Art Davis; Layout – Paul Sommer; Backgrounds – Art Lozzi; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – Alex Lovy; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1960.

FOURTH SEASON
Caveman Huck
Animation – George Goepper; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – Paul Sommer; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Huck of the Irish
Animation – La Verne Harding; Layout – Noel Tucker; Backgrounds – Bob Gentle; Written By – Tony Benedict; Story Director – Paul Sommer; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
All Voices: Daws Butler.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Jungle Bungle
Animation – Ralph Somerville; Layout – Dan Noonan; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Written By – Carl Kohler; Story Director – Art Davis; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Ben Huck
Animation – John Boersma; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Art Lozzi; Written By – Tony Benedict; Story Director – Lew Marshall; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Huck’ dé Paris
Animation – Ken Southworth; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Art Lozzi; Written By – Tony Benedict; Story Director – Lew Marshall; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
All Voices: Daws Butler.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Bullfighter Huck
Animation – Ken Southworth; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Written By – Tony Benedict; Story Director – John Freeman; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Two For Tee Vee
Animation – Don Towsley; Layout – Tony Rivera; Backgrounds – Art Lozzi; Written By – Warren Foster; Story Director – John Freeman; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Don Messick.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Bars and Stripes
Animation – John Boersma; Layout – James Carmichael; Backgrounds – Art Lozzi; Written By – Tony Benedict; Story Director – John Freeman; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Daws Butler; Vance Colvig.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Scrubby Brush Man
Animation – Edwin Parks; Layout – James Carmichael; Backgrounds – Dick Thomas; Written By – Tony Benedict; Story Director – John Freeman; Titles – Lawrence Goble; Production Supervision – Howard Hanson.
Voices: Don Messick; Daws Butler.
Music: Hoyt Curtin.
Copyright 1961.

Happily, there are also some Italian versions of Quick Draw McGraw and Pixie and Dixie on-line (for example, Bob Givens is credited as being the layout artist for Six Gun Spook, so he worked on more than just Augie Doggie). With any luck, complete credits are available for all of them somewhere that we can finally post so those who worked on cartoons that many of us have enjoyed for many years get the recognition they deserve.

26 comments:

  1. Thank you for providing this information! Where did you find these- Youtube?

    It clears up a lot of mysteries as to the Season 3 and 4 animators. As more animators came on board during those seasons it was often hard to identify them- particularly those who didn't do much H-B work such as Brad Case, Ed DiMattea, Ken Southworth and Don Towsley.

    Interesting that the last Season 3 episode had Curtin score rather than Capital. And that George Goepper was animating at H-B that early. He does work on some TOP CATs made later that season.

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  2. Nice detectiving work there, Yowp. The Maltese credit is a bit odd, to say the least, since the H-B and WB studio histories say Foster was the first to sign on with Bill and Joe, followed by Maltese (which is why Mike was briefly reunited with Friz Freleng before leaving the studio).

    Perhaps "Grim Pilgrim" was sort of a test cartoon for Maltese, to get him use to the studio's operations before they really put him to work doing all the shorts on the Quick Draw show?

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  3. Nice snoopin' there - especially useful for who wrote what in the later seasons. Very good stuff.

    I wonder, going by these rediscovered credits, whether Tony Benedict was also responsible for a few of the Ricochet Rabbit shorts when penning The Magilla Gorilla Show aside. The finale "Jail Break-In" reuses the "convict refusing to leave" plot, if I recall...

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  4. JL, according to Mike Barrier, Foster left for Sutherland before he went to H-B. I don't know who arrived when. Bob Givens says he and Maltese were a package deal, so to speak.
    Chris, we'll never know about those. They never had credits on each cartoon. Tony might remember, though.
    Howard, there might be one or two on YT. It seems, though, Italian TV is running (or has run) the early HB shorts with full credits for a couple of years. If one of our European readers can direct me to .avi copies of the Quick Draws and Pixie and Dixies in Italian, I'll be happy. They have credits, too.
    And they're not beat up old prints; I suspect they're from the restored cartoons that were supposed to be released and never were.

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  5. "Yowp-Yowp" Dodsworth,

    This is a very interesting material which our friends from The Big Cartoon DataBase (http://bcdb.com) would shall see with more care.

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  6. This is fascinating! Greatly appreciated. I had no idea George Goepper did Huck shows, I thought he came in for TopCat, like Jerry Hatchock did.

    James 'Jim' Carmichael has history at Disney; his name is on a few early 1940s Pluto cartoons, and he is credited as one of the performers of the "When I see an Elephant fly" song in Dumbo.

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  7. Steve C., thanks for your note. You're right. It was a last-minute cut and paste so I've fixed it.
    Zartok, thanks for the note about Carmichael. I imagine we'll find other surprises when the remaining credits are viewed. I'm curious how many cartoons Manny Perez and Virgil Ross did.
    Rodinei, I've sent some stuff there before. We'll see what happens.
    As for Wrong-ipedia, it's a waste of my time. I've done a lot of research on a couple of posts only to have internet clowns edit and re-edit what I wrote with joke entries.

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  8. I suspect you're already aware of 'Lets duck out'.

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  9. Good golly, the longer I live, the more I learn!

    Just counting the Hoyt Curtin scored Hucks has, for decades, lead me to believe the fourth season had TEN SHOWS! Now, as you report, it has NINE!

    This would also explain, for those who may have watched Huck on the “USA Cartoon Express” circa 1986-1987, why “Cluck and Dagger” was the only Curtin scored Huck in that package. They only took the first three seasons – and not the last (for whatever reason).

    Carl Kohler? Did he ever write anything else for HB? They seemed to be somewhat loyal to their writers – at least in those early days.

    Great detective work on this, Yowp!

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  10. Joe, Cluck and Dagger debuted the week of March 25, 1960 along with a rerun of Pixie and Dixie in Puss and Boats and a Hokey cartoon which remains unidentified.

    I don't know if Kohler was freelancing or whether he wrote anything else (thanks to missing credits). If Tony Benedict remembers, perhaps he can post a note.

    Zartok, that cartoon's the reason I wonder what else he may have animated.

    It's actually pretty crappy detective work (Snooper would be proud). I could have tracked this down a couple of years ago. Back then, I tried searching for Yogi in Italian (and French) but not Huck.

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  11. Don't you mean March 25, 1961? Hokey's series began as a supporting segment on Huck's show in January 1961 to vacate Yogi's spot. And I believe "Puss and Boats" was a Season 3 short. Either way, March seems like a very late date to air a new episode. But then based on clippings of vintage TV schedules you've posted, all thirteen new segments of an established character were introduced sporadically through the season rather than on consecutive weeks in early fall- the way Saturday AM would do.

    @J Lee: As far as I know, the QUICK DRAW McGRAW SHOW bowed in fall 1959, the same time Season 2 of Huck's show did. So unless Bill and Joe had Maltese write "Grim Pilgrim" way in advance, he would have already been busy composing stories for all three QD segments at that time. Maybe that heavy workload is why Foster took over the Huck shorts, along with show tenants Yogi and the Meeces.

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  12. Yes, Howard, '61. I don't know when it went into production, but it was on show No. 52, the last new one of the third season. So a March debut isn't surprising, given how reruns were being used in between new episodes. In fact, I've only been able to find two brand-new Hucks prior to Yogi being spun off in January, though my research is preliminary.

    As for the second season, work on Augie appears to have been started much later than the other two elements on the show, judging by the production numbers. That could conceivably give him time to work on the Huck show, but that's speculation. I don't think we'll ever know.

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  13. Howard -- I was just looking at some of the early Season 2 Hucks also having a credit for Dan Gordon similar to the Season 1 episodes and thinking that Maltese might have been started here in order to "punch up" some early preliminary work done by Gordon and possibly Charles Shows on some Huck stories, before being allowed to run free on his own on the Quick Draw series (Foster would have handled the other cartoons that might have been originally conceived during Season 1 -- "Ten Pin Alley" definitely has a first-season vibe going for it, even though Warren shares story credit with Gordon).

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  14. In addition to his Disney work, James Carmichael was also a layout artist in the 40's for Columbia, and his name showed up frequently in the 70's as a story director on some of HB's TV series.

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  15. Never thought of "Ten Pin Alley" having a Season 1 vibe. For one thing, it has typically polished animation from Ed Love. The presence of Pierre, and continuous commentary from the narrator could conceivably evoke a Season 1 vibe. Apparently televised bowling matches were accompanied by off-screen commentary, because it's also used in a lengthy bowling scene in the Season 3 FLINTSTONE episode "Barney the Invisible"- coincidentally, written by Foster.

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  16. And Yowp, if you look at the credits of the Yogi Bear Show cartoons, there's a few more strange names. Disney artist and "Firehouse Five" member Clarke Mallery shows up as an animator on a Yakky Doodle cartoon, his only known credit for Hanna-Barbera. He would later work at Filmation in the 60's and 70's.

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  17. You have to remember that these cartoons were originally exhibited two ways: first, as part of the original half-hour shows they were featured in (just the opening title was shown), and later syndicated with self-contained opening and closing titles- some of them had theme music underscoring the titles, but most were silent. For example, the syndicated "Huckkeberry Hound" package was distributed with and without music in their titles. WNEW-TV, Channel 5 in New York got the ones with just the opening titles (although most of the "Yogi Bear" episodes had full titles), and showed them from the late '60s through the mid-'70s. On the other hand, their "Quick Draw McGraw" package HAD music in their titles, and they showed those intact. Cartoon Network, on the other hand, had "Huckleberry Hound" episodes from season two onwards without music underneath those opening/closing titles, and usually edited the opening titles out after the initial H-B credit.

    I am finally happy to know WHO did WHAT on all of them! Tony Benedict wrote the last handful of "Huckleberry Hound" episodes because H-B had expanded to the point where, by 1961, Warren Foster couldn't write new episodes while concentrating on "THE FLINTSTONES", et. al.

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  18. Not only that but Jack Carr, Phil Duncan (Disney, UPA) and Gil Turner (MGM, WB, UPA) each animated one Snagglepuss cartoon. C.L. Hartman and Robert Bentley both did several cartoons of each segment, and then seemed to leave the studio after the 1961-62 season. Supposedly Hanna and Barbera hired many freelancing or moonlighting animators in order to fill their increasingly heavy workload.

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  19. Watched "Ten Pin Alley" again this morning, and to me, while the animation is certainly fuller than what was the norm for Season 1, there's a laid-back nature (along with a stretching of some of the gags) that seem to be more of a hallmark of the Shows-Gordon cartoons. Once Foster got going, the Huck cartoons had far more gags in them and were better paced than the opening season ("TPA" aired on Boomerang today right after the Season 3 opener "Spud Dud", and you could see the improvement, where in the S3 opener there was no lingering over a gag just to fill time).

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  20. It's quite interesting to compare Huck cartoons as written by Shows versus those written by Foster. To add to the equation, Benedict's Huck was extremely chatty with the audience, constantly explaining the facets of his job in that particular episode and what he plans to do next.

    Foster made the most of parodying the genre or ambience of the particular cartoon, whether it be Western, sci-fi or crime caper. The Benedict episodes leaned towards the blackout gag format: trying to capture Pierre, make a sale, or get Fats Dynamo out of prison.

    And in most Benedict episodes, Huck would take a lot of physical punishment resulting in him lying in a heap with stars going around his head. This would also be the case in many Benedict-scripted episodes of THE FLINTSTONES.

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  21. Howie Fein,

    Don't forget that Gil Turner also worked on Universal/Walter Lantz.

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  22. I see Carmichael served overseas in Guam, according to the reprints of the 'Top Cel' animation newsletter from New York on the Asteriskpix blog.

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  23. Hey, this is really good, i like these credits list posts, could i have permission to use only some of this list, it's a pretty good one you made, yes indeed.

    Hopefully some Italian restored credits versions of the Yogi Bear cartoons (sans most of the 1961 ones on DVD) will show up soon.

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  24. They have showed up. They don't have credits; they're exactly the same as the North American versions circulating.

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  25. Carl Kohler was my father. Questions?

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  26. Hi, CZM. Was he freelancing at Hanna-Barbera or was he hired in the story department and decided not to stay long?
    I know he was at Warners at one time as well.

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